Week 10: Why the #LBBill is important to me #107days

Today’s blog post is a guest blog from John Lish. When the first draft of the #LBBill was shared, John was one of the many people who provided feedback, and his feedback is directly reflected in, and vastly improves, the current draft of the Bill. As part of Week 10, an action week to encourage you all to write to your MP and tell them about the Bill, John offered to share a blog post about why the Bill was important to him. Here it is:

Although I had heard of Connor Sparrowhawk and his death through news reports, I hadn’t been aware of last year’s #107days campaign. It was a conversation with Claire Jones (a contributor to the Justice Quilt) during a break in our work with the Barker Commission that brought the Justice for LB campaign and the LBBill to my attention. I joined the Facebook page set up by Mark Neary to discuss the LBBill shortly afterwards.

Now, like Connor, I am on the autistic spectrum but that in itself doesn’t entail motivation or importance to this campaign. It allows some perspective and insight but the essential drivers to support this campaign are a visceral sense of injustice and a desire to see change occur that allows everyone to have the support that enables control over their lives which most take for granted.

Yet there is a personal element to my support and it revolves around the idea of time. I was diagnosed as being on the spectrum in my late 30s a few years ago. Thinking back, I can see where my autistic traits interplayed through my life such as my intolerance of adult authority figures if I thought them idiotic and would express that opinion. These days, I suspect that 7 year old would be diagnosed with ‘oppositional defiant disorder’ and my parents offered drug management of said condition. In the 1970s, I was just considered to be a badly behaved awkward git. While today’s world is different, I’m not entirely sure that it has progressed in an entirely beneficial manner.

That seems to be particularly true when dealing with teenagers who happen to be autistic and/or have learning difficulties. My teenage years were difficult for me and my family and there were periods where none of us coped with my depression and behaviour. The difference made to my family and I was the community support from the local Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. It was appropriate and gave me the space to work through the complexities within my head.

Reflecting now on what occurred some 25 years ago, the definition of adolescent seems broader than today. The past wasn’t obsessed with the notion of “transition” that exist today and having rigid barriers between child and adult services. There was less money around as well which may seem a bad thing but given the growth in ATUs which have coincided with the pump-priming that occurred in the NHS from the turn of the century, more money appears to have facilitated more interventions with worse outcomes.

There also seems to be more labelling of conditions which is a concern when issues such as mental health problems are seen as a result of having autism for example. That may be true for some but equally we shouldn’t lose sight of someone with autism who just happens to have a mental health problem. Their autism will affect the state of their mental health but we shouldn’t assume it drives their mental health issues as the individual gets consumed within the condition. This is why clause 8 of the #LBBill is so important.

This is why I feel fortunate. Back during that dark period, I didn’t have a label of a condition. I was just a young man who was depressed, alienated and inarticulate. Importantly I was given the time and space to find myself. A process that has continued to this day. The point about autism is that its a development disorder but it doesn’t mean the absence of development, merely its a different process. Sometimes that is close to normal development or it can be very different in expression or timescales. It is always very human.

That perhaps is the hardest part of this #107days campaign. That Connor didn’t get the time and space he deserved and that absence of time is marked by this finite period. That feels very cruel.

So the #LBBill is important to me because all the dudes deserve the support, time and space to live their lives however and whatever that looks like. The support I’ve had, the time and space to explore and experience the world shouldn’t be a gift to be bestowed but simply a human right of expression. There is some distance to go but if the #LBBill became an Act then it would be an important step towards achieving that.

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Week 10: 1 in 4 MPs contacted re #LBBill, still 75% to go #107days

Wow, what a weekend of #bankholidayactivism. Ever since the #JusticeforLB campaign evolved/emerged/was born (still not sure which of these is most true) we’ve been blown away by the responsiveness of people. This weekend proved no exception and we’re delighted to now share that slightly over 25% of all MPs in Westminster have been contacted about the #LBBill.

Seriously, that’s 1 in 4 who will know about LB, who will hear about his entirely preventable death, and who hopefully will read up on the #LBBill and lend their support to it. The responses from MPs on twitter and email has been overwhelmingly positive, where they’ve had a chance to engage, and let’s be honest MPs are allowed time off too and given it was a bank holiday and the start of half term for most people, we really didn’t expect to have had pretty much any response.

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We’re not getting complacent though. As wonderful as it is to see that all MPs in Norfolk and Devon have heard about the #LBBill there are still whole swathes of white on our map where people don’t yet know.

So this is a quick thank you, a mini celebration and a call for further action.

If you are reading this, and you care about disabled people, please take action to contact your own MP and let others know about the Bill and what it proposes. You can read Sara’s post from yesterday for more on what difference the LBBill would have made to LB – short answer is he would probably still be alive today, playing with his footy guys and chatting away to Chunky Stan.

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We need to make sure no other family suffer the same loss that LB’s have, that no more disabled people are denied what are essentially very basic human rights. So please take action, we need to give the #LBBill every chance to be heard in Parliament.

Thank you all.

Week 10: Tell your MP about #LBBill #107days

The #LBBill is an idea to change the law for disabled people so that they have more control over what happens in their lives. We need your help to achieve that.

So Week 10 of #107days is an action week and we’ve dedicated it to promoting the #LBBill to all the MPs (new and old) now in Westminster. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the #LBBill you can visit the Bill website here and read the full draft Bill here. As with everything #JusticeforLB it has been developed organically and collaboratively, gathering feedback from far and wide including hundreds of disabled people, family members and allies. You can watch a short film (6 mins) about the #LBBill, where it came from and why it’s important here:

We need to contact as many MPs as possible to make them aware of the #LBBill and ask for their support in the Private Member’s Ballot. You can write to your MP via the WriteToThem website (it’ll even tell you who your MP is if you’re not sure); you could also tweet your MP and ask them to pledge their support to the Bill. If you’re unsure of what to say, you could include any of the following:

Please tell your MP that you support the #JusticeforLB campign and that you’re asking them to support a Private Members Bill drafted by the campaign. Please also explain that supporters of the campaign have come together to draft a Bill which would promote and protect disabled people’s right to live in the community with choices equal to others and the support they need. It has become known as ‘LB Bill’ in memory of Connor Sparrowhawk (who was known as LB or Laughing Boy).

Your MP might like to know that the Bill is on its second draft and has had feedback from hundreds of disabled people, family members and allies. The Bill has mass support, as you can see on the campaign website https://lbbill.wordpress.com/supporters. It builds on existing legislation, including the Care Act 2014.

Sign off encouraging your MP to support this Bill and why not ask them to encourage their colleagues to do so. Also encourage them, if they are eligible for and successful in the Private Members Bill ballot, to sponsor the Bill. It would help us if you asked them to reply to let you know whether they support the Bill. It takes two minutes to pledge their support and they can do so here: http://eepurl.com/73mXX

Please add a comment to this post with your MP’s name (and their party and your constituency if you know it) once you’ve contacted them directly, this will help us keep track on how many MPs know about the Bill. If your MP replies and has any specific questions or wishes to discuss the #LBBill then they can email us at LBBillFeedback@gmail.com We look forward to the pledges of support flooding in.

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